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A person who has completed five years residence in the UK and has held Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) for last one year can apply for naturalisation as a British Citizen. A person who is married to a British Citizen can apply for naturalisation as a British Citizen as soon as such person has completed 3 years residence in the UK and has Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR) in the UK. The applicant must not have any unspent criminal conviction and must have passed Life in the UK Test before an application for naturalisation as a British Citizen is made to the Home Office, UKBA.

Why Sunrise Solicitors For Your Application For Naturalisation As A British Citizen?

The immigration solicitors at Sunrise Solicitors are experts in dealing with applications for naturalisation as British Citizens. The quality of our service is self-evident from the reviews of our clients about the service provided by our immigration lawyers. You can contact us if you are seeking legal help from immigration lawyers in London in relation to your application for Naturalisation as a British Citizen and our immigration solicitors will provide you fast, friendly, reliable and professional immigration service.

Our Fees For An Application For Naturalisation As A British Citizen

  • We will charge you a fee from £800.00 + VAT for our professional immigration services in relation to your application for naturalisation as a British Citizen. The agreed fee will depend on the complexity of the matter and the casework involved in the matter. If you are instructing us for more than one MN1/AN application, our fee will be £400 + VAT for each application.
  • Please be advised that VAT will not be applicable where our client does not have a valid leave to remain in the UK at the time of his/her instructions to us in relation to his/her immigration matter.
  • If you cannot afford to pay our fee in full at the time of instructing us in relation to your matter, you can pay half of the fee at the time of instructing us and rest of the fee can be paid by monthly installments.
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  • Naturalisation - FAQs
  • 1. What application form is used to apply for naturalisation as a British Citizen?

    Application form AN is used to apply for naturalisation as a British Citizen.

  • 2. What are the standard requirements for naturalisation as a British citizen?

    There are seven requirements you need to meet before you apply:

    • You must be aged 18 or over.
    • You must be of sound mind.
    • You must intend to continue living in the UK, or to continue in Crown service, the service of an international organisation of which the UK is a member, or the service of a company or association established in the UK.
    • You must be able to communicate in English, Welsh or Scottish Gaelic to an acceptable degree.
    • You must have sufficient knowledge of life in the UK.
    • You must be of good character.
    • You must meet the residential requirements.
  • 3. What are the residential requirements for naturalisation as a British citizen?

    To demonstrate the residential requirements for naturalisation, you must have:

    • been resident in the UK for at least five years (this is known as the residential qualifying period); and
    • been present in the UK five years before the date of your application; and
    • not spent more than 450 days outside the UK during the five-year period; and
    • not spent more than 90 days outside the UK in the last 12 months of the five-year period; and
    • not been in breach of the Immigration Rules at any stage during the five-year period.
  • 4. When does the residential qualifying period start?

    The residential qualifying period is calculated from the day when the UKBA receive your application. Most unsuccessful applications fail because the applicant was not present in the UK at the beginning of the residential qualifying period. You must make sure you meet this requirement before you make your application. For example, if the UKBA receive your application on 25 March 2010, you must show that you were in the UK on 26 March 2005.

    If you have spent time in the UK while you were exempt from immigration control, you cannot include this time as part of the residential qualifying period. If you were in the UK as a diplomat or as a member of visiting armed forces, or if you were in any place of detention, you are considered to have been exempt from immigration control during that time. This time is treated as absence from the UK when the UKBA assess your application.

  • 5. What are immigration time restrictions to apply for naturalisation as a British citizen?

    You must be free from immigration time restrictions when you apply for naturalisation. Unless you are married to or the civil partner of a British citizen, you should have been free from immigration time restrictions during the last 12 months of the residential qualifying period.

    If you are free from immigration time restrictions, there will probably be a stamp or sticker in your passport saying that you have indefinite leave to enter or remain or no time limit on your stay. But you may have a letter or a Biometric Residence Permit from the Home Office saying that you are free from immigration conditions.

  • 6. What are the requirements for naturalisation for EEA nationals?

    If you are a national of a country in the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland, or you are the family member of such a person, you will automatically have permanent residence status if you have exercised EEA free-movement rights in the UK for a continuous five-year period ending on or after 30 April 2006. You do not need to apply for leave to remain. You should have held permanent residence status for 12 months before you apply for naturalisation.

    If you have been outside the UK for six months or more in any one of the five years of the residence period, you will have broken your residence. This does not apply if:

    • the absence was due to military service; or
    • all absences were for under 12 months and were for important reasons such as pregnancy, childcare, serious illness, study, vocational training or an overseas posting.

    If you leave the UK for a continuous period of two years or more, you will lose your permanent residence status.

    If you have indefinite leave to remain (ILR) in the UK, you will be considered to be settled here provided that you have not been away for two years or more since you received ILR.

  • 7. What are the absences from the UK during the residential qualifying period?

    During the residential qualifying period, you must not have been absent from the UK for more than 450 days during last five years. You must not have been absent for more than 90 days in the last 12 months. The UKBA have  discretion to allow absences above the normal limits.

  • 8. What are the requirements to apply for naturalisation as a British citizen on the grounds of Crown Service?

    If you are applying on the grounds of your Crown service instead of your residence in the UK, you must show that you:

    • are serving overseas in Crown service on the date when your application is received; and
    • have been the holder of a responsible post overseas; and
    • have given outstanding service, normally over a substantial period; and
    • have a close connection with the UK.

    Crown service is an alternative only to the residence requirements for naturalisation. You must still meet the other requirements for naturalisation.

  • 9. How do the Home Office, UKBA exercise discretion on absences from the UK during the residential qualifying period?

    The Home Office normally disregards absences of up to 300 days.

    If you have been absent for between 301 and 540 days, the Home Office will disregard this if you meet all the other requirements and have established your home, family and a large part of your estate in the UK. The Home Office would also expect that:

    • for absences of up to 450 days, you have been resident in the UK for the past four years; or
    • for absences of more than 450 days, you have been resident in the UK for the past five years; or
    • the absences occurred because you were serving abroad in Crown service or because your husband, wife or civil partner was serving abroad in Crown or designated service; or
    • the absences were unavoidable owing to the nature of your work - for example, because you are a merchant seaman or you work for a UK-based business which requires frequent travel abroad; or
    • there are exceptional or compelling reasons of an occupational or compassionate nature, such as having a firm job offer for which British citizenship is a genuine requirement.

    Absences during the final year

    If you have been absent from the UK for up to 100 days in total during the final year, the Home Office normally disregards the absence.

    If you have been absent from the UK for between 101 and 180 days in total during the final year, the Home Office normally disregards the absence if:

    • you have met the residence requirements over the qualifying period; and
    • you have demonstrated a link with the UK by establishing your home, family and a large part of your estate here in the UK.

    If your absence lasted between 101 and 180 days and you have not met the residence requirements over the qualifying period, the Home Office will only disregard the absence if:

    • you have demonstrated a link with the UK by establishing your home, family and a large part of your estate here; and
    • the absence occurred because you were serving abroad in Crown service, or for a compelling occupational or compassionate reason.

    If you have been absent from the UK for more than 180 days in total during the final year,  will only disregard the absence if:

    • you have met the residence requirements over the qualifying period; and
    • you have demonstrated a link with the UK by establishing your home, family and a large part of your estate here; and
    • the absence occurred because you were serving abroad in Crown service, or for a compelling occupational or compassionate reason.

    If your absence lasted more than 180 days and you have not met the residence requirements over the qualifying period, the Home Office will only consider disregarding the absence in exceptional circumstances.